SAMR = SMART

What is the best way to encourage teachers to extend themselves from task enhancement to task transformation using the SAMR model?

This is a question I ask myself every day in my role as EdTech Coach. I think the best way to encourage teachers to extend towards Redefining tasks with technology is to help them understand that certain literacy skills can only be taught through technology.

Recently I delivered a Digital Literacy PD session which addressed using the SAMR model to better deliver Digital Literacy skills in the classroom. The PD focused on breaking down Digital Literacy into Six Multi-Literacy Strands. I used MediaSmarts as a resource for defining these six strands further and created this visual to showcase the importance of preparing students for a networked, media-rich world:

MultiLiteracies of a DigitalAge
Created by Jocelyn Sutherland. Symbols from CC Google Image Search. Inspired by MediaSmarts.ca definition of Digital Literacy

 

I used the CommonSense Media video on the SAMR model which does a brilliant job of extending beyond the Substitution and Augmentation phase:

In my role, I am less concerned with my own implementation of SAMR and more concerned with how I can coach teachers to adopt this model of thinking in their own classrooms. In theory, SAMR makes sense, but in practice it takes a lot more planning and thinking outside the box. As part of the PD session I led, I developed this planning guide for teachers to use to transform a unit using the SAMR model (PDF here):

Tuesday Oct 27th- Digital Literacy & Citizenship (1)

I hoped that by making a link between the Multi-Literacies in a Digital Age and SAMR, teachers would see how important it is to teach these literacies using technological devices and platforms. For example, it’s necessary for students to be exposed to networking on social media in order to learn and practice social literacy. Furthermore, information literacy now encompasses the scope of researching on the internet, therefore students must have access to digital sources in order to decipher which sources are reliable. According to MediaSmarts, media literacy is defined as:

“… ‘text’ that includes images, audio and digital media, media literacy is closely associated with digital literacy. Media literacy reflects our ability to access, analyze, evaluate and produce media through understanding and appreciation of:

  • the art, meaning and messaging of various forms of media texts
  • the impact and influence of mass media and popular culture
  • how media texts are constructed and why they are produced
  • how media can be used to communicate our own ideas effectively”  MediaSmarts.ca

This definition further supports the need for students to produce media in order to understand it. Since most media is visual and multi-modal, technological devices such as iPads, laptops, or even cameras are necessary tools to redefine the task of producing media texts. I hope the above planning sheet helps teachers see the importance of making connections between Literacy, Digital Literacy and Technology Integration and that none are mutually exclusive anymore.

This statement by MediaSmarts further highlights the pedagogical shift that needs to happen in schools:

“Technology has shifted the traditional classroom paradigm that positions the teacher as the expert. This can be hard for many educators to accept, but it’s not necessarily a bad thing. In our quickly evolving technological world, we are all learners, and teachers who are willing to share responsibility with students are more likely to be comfortable – and effective – in a networked classroom.” MediaSmarts.ca

If I were to use the SAMR Model to define my coaching I would showcase it in the following way (my first attempt at Piktochart…lots to learn!):

SAMR EdTech Coach (1)

50% of my role is Redefinition: helping teachers and student rethink learning through iPads, laptops and online platforms. Connecting with other EdTech coaches through online PD like Coetail & Eduro. Showcasing learning using blogs and sharing & connecting on Twitter. Engaging teachers and classrooms in global eLearning through projects like Hour of CodeIf You Learned Here and the Travelling Teddybear Project.

30% of my role is Modification: working with teachers to enhance tasks using iPads; Introducing Blogs and ePortfolio platforms. Using Professional Development workshops to introduce and model ways to embed technology in the curriculum. Technology has modified my delivery of PD as I can have teachers learn apps by using them as part of the workshop. Using Infographics (like above) to summarise my role. Using QR codes on posters to encourage teachers to use their devices.

15% of my role is Augmentation: pushing in to classrooms and helping students and teachers become more technologically literate. This may involve workshop on logging in to GAFE environment and using collaborative GAFE tools, instead of desktop tools.

5% of my role is Substitution: working with teachers to better communicate over email; and substituting paper communication (posters, newsletters) with digital communication via email, GAFE or Schoology platform.

Re-thinking Design Tech: Making MakerSpaces

I recently had the privilege of attending and presenting at the ECIS Tech Conference at Bavarian International School in Munich Germany.

My workshop was centred around Technology in the Early Years, and highlighted key apps and devices teachers could use to support a play-based environment. One of the greatest research-based platforms I found is the TEC Center. Below is my Google Presentation which draws on some theories from Chip Donohue’s most recent book Technology and Digital Media in the Early Years:

Sonya TerBorg also created a visual notes drawing on the key take-aways from my presentation (Photo & Image used with @terSonya’s permission):

VisualNotesJOCELYNECIS

Three key presentations and workshops inspired me to explore the possibility of setting up maker spaces at our school to further promote creativity and the design process in the PYP.

3D for a Cause: Presentation by Sarah Woods

This thought-provoking workshop focused on ways to better integrate using the Design Cycle with students. Sarah focused on the International Baccalaureate (IBO) Middle Years Program (MYP) Design Cycle as an example but it could be modified for a variety of age groups and curriculum frameworks.

Sarah began by discussing how she gets her students excited about design, by presenting them with a problem first. Since I work at a PYP (Primary Years Program) school, this mirrored my philosophy of inquiry-based teaching, by beginning with the ‘why’ first. She described how she engages students by having them brainstorm 100 problems in 7 minutes. She emphasised that these could be vast or small and they need to be problems with no solutions yet. Allowing students the freedom to let their imagination run wild with the various problems they may encounter day-to-day addresses a variety of Learner Profile characteristics as well as promoting communication and group work skills. Once students have their page of problems she has them narrow down their selection to be their focus for the next project. Sarah emphasises that students should start with paper and have their idea mapped out clearly before they begin to explore the software. Nearly half of the design cycle is ‘Investigating’ and ‘Planning’ so she also explains to students that they will be making several designs, and perfection is not the goal. 1

The tools she focused on in this workshop were primarily software for 3D printing. Sarah believes these 3D printers allow students to revisit and improve their design. Some of the software she recommended for Primary and Middle Years students were 123Design and Tinkercad. Since ‘Evaluate’ is another key component in the MYP design cycle, the students spend a significant part of their project time assessing ways to improve and make

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Sarah Woods shares key software for 3D printers, which can often cause frustration and test patience, but ultimately build design and problem-solving skills.

One way Sarah has empowered students to properly assess the success of their product is through shapeways.com, a space to sell and share their products. This opportunity also allows students to understand basic economics as their supply and costs fluctuate depending on the need/want for their product.

Our current school has recently purchased two 3D printers. While the IB Primary Years Program does not include a design cycle yet, we are looking at ways to bring design in through the PYP Units of Inquiry. Currently, there is a large void of science and design technology in the IB PYP and often it is left up to teachers and curriculum coordinators to find where science and design ‘fit’ with the school’s curriculum and the units. There are numerous links to math through the use of such software as Tinkercad, it’s just that many teachers don’t have experience or confidence putting students on software they are unfamiliar with. One of the main take-aways from Sarah’s workshop was that it’s up to the teachers to put the problems in the students’ hands, rather than scaffolding the solution for them. She emphasised the importance of letting students teach each other, and suggested the software be a homework assignment so that valuable class time can be spent on the design process. The skills students learn by cooperating together to solve a problem (such as how does this software work) are much more transdisciplinary than a direct-teacher approach which doesn’t provide any opportunity for students to work together and learn from each other. Introducing new software and devices such as Tinkercad and 3D printers are excellent ways to naturally embed these important problem-solving skills that will promote lifelong learning in all students.

Make Space for Makerspace: Presented by Mark Shillitoe

I was deeply inspired and impressed by what’s happening at Etoy GEMS World Academy, in particular with IT and Makerspaces. Mark Shillitoe highlighted the different programs that were implemented this year, and how the physical space has been transformed into an engaging learning space for students. Mark emphasised the importance of inviting “curiosity and wonderment into your school”, as Kath Murdoch encourages us to do.

Mark expressed that this quote is what drove his vision for edTech at the GEMS Etoy campus. He focused on developing the idea of #techxture when thinking of the role of IT in schools, remembering that edTech is not just about balancing screen time. Mark described the importance of addressing the notion of screen-time with teachers and parents, and differentiating different kinds of screen-based learning.

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Sample Pop-Up Makerspace created by Mark Shillitoe for ECIS Tech Conference

From my experience, this has been the biggest struggle as an edTech coach; understanding that passive screen time and creation-based screen time have very different learning results. Mark added a new element to screen time, the physical connections we can add on to iPads, using new technology like Makey-Makeys. These new tools are simple circuits that allow any conductive object to become part of a functioning circuit.

Mark shared some of his own struggles implementing the Maker-mindset at his school, and came up with the idea of Pop-Up Makerspaces. These makerspaces didn’t infringe on busy teacher schedules, and provoked curiosity among both students and staff. He set up these spaces during break and lunch times and many of the makerspaces were self-discovery focused, meaning any student or teacher could approach and try to figure out the task. Throughout the 2-day conference Mark had set up his own version of Pop-Up Makerspaces and invited conference participants to try out new technologies such as Makey-Makey Dance Mat Pacman and Minecraft using Raspberry Pi.

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Students use Makey-Makey to create a banana keyboard. Photo Credit: CTJ Online via Compfight cc

The idea of Pop-Up Makerspaces is very relevant in my present school context. Currently, we are limited for space, and while a Makerspace would be ideal, proposing the idea of a moveable or Pop-Up Makerspace seems more likely to be approved by administrators. I find a lot of new technology could in fact be taken on by student leaders, and perhaps introducing these spaces to students first, and having them feed back to their classrooms and teachers would be a more engaging and lasting way to introduce the Maker-mindset into teaching and learning. Once teachers can see the science and math links that naturally result from utilising Makerspace tools and coding software, opportunities for curriculum amendments will follow.

UNIS CoLaboratory: Workshop with Francesca Zammarano
This workshop began with a provocative and entertaining clip from the movie Apollo 13, showcasing the moment NASA needed to make a “square peg fit in a round hole” using just the materials the astronauts were presented with on board the shuttle. Francesca Zammarano used this clip as a spring board for discussing the possibilities for creative problem solving using everyday items and basic materials.

This year, UNIS has redesigned their computer lab into a functional and creative Maker Space for students, which they are calling a CoLaboratory. The philosophy behind this space is to help promote 5 key ‘maker traits’: curiosity, enthusiasm, creativity, courage and vision. According to Francesca, the space is more about development of self and less about the stripping of wires and understanding circuits. In this space, students learn what it means to fail and understand that learning comes from failure.

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Francesca took us through the the costs and process of redesigning their IT lab to be a useable space for creation. It was about a $30,000 USD investment to transform the room and add key components such as: whiteboard tables, a tool wall, storage wall, and working space. She detailed the importance of maintaining a ‘safe to fail’ attitude within the CoLaboratory, and she explained how she has students “make friends with failure’” and chant the phrase “Safe to fail!” before the begin projects.

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We were then introduced to a variety of simple, creative projects that students were encouraged to explore. Francesca would present the students with a bunch of materials and ask them to either solve a problem or create something that would accomplish a task. Some of the resulting creations from the CoLaboratory ranged from a simple ‘scribble bot’ (using a BeeBot and markers) to sewing plush animals using conductive thread to explore basic circuitry concepts.

As my current school moves more towards an embedded design and technology curriculum, I see a lot of potential in re-thinking our current spaces and implementing more open-inquiry tasks for students to learn these important skills and concepts.

The second part of this workshop included building simple circuits from scratch using button batteries, copper wire, LED lights and cardboard. We were given instructions for building a simple multiple choice answer board, which could be used to assess any curricular area.

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Materials provided for second part of the UNIS CoLaboratory workshop

 

One of the educators leading the workshop was the French teacher, and he initiated this idea in his classroom to engage students in learning basic grammar rules such as masculine and feminine pronouns.I can see many connections to all disciplines in the PYP, particularly for formative assessments. This simple way of embedding problem-solving and basic science skills is an excellent example of teaching science through other subject areas. Furthermore, it empowers students to be makers and creators, which further develop skills such as confidence, resilience and promotes design thinking.

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My simple circuit created from scratch using the instructions from the workshop (I just needed to add the wires).

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Sample circuit-board game created by 4th Grade UNIS student for French class

One of the greatest take aways was seeing how in just a few months her school has transformed and evolved their curriculum to include key elements of design and problem-solving skills. Francesca shared the revised the UNIS Design Tech curriculum (link) to include characteristics of ‘maker’ students as well as design-thinking skills.

Showcasing Learning through Blogging: UbD Course 1 Final Project

Week 6: Reflections

As one of four EdTech coaches at our medium-sized international school, I had the privilege of co-coordinating a two-day Tech Conference, featuring Jeff Utecht as our Keynote speaker. The research, planning and coordination of this event is what led me to join this COETAIL cohort and a lot of my tensions outlined in my various blog posts highlight my own attempts to shift the learning landscape of our school in my short time here.

Coming from Asia, where I previously taught at 1:1 schools, I was baffled at how traditional my new school was, especially with regards to the use of technology. The first 4 months I related quite a lot to Annie and Claires perspective on our roles as EdTech Coaches. Even after several smaller EdTech PD workshops I was still often referred to as “the Technology Teacher” and was told my role is to “teach technology” to students. Some of this is still the truth, as many students are unfamiliar with how to use iPads in a classroom setting, and re-framing their thinking and teaching them specific skills to use the device has been a large part of my role this year. The fact is, there is a mild fear surrounding the use of these devices, and hence students have very little practice with them. So I made it my goal that this EdTech Conference would be the beginning of the end of Technophobia in our learning environment.

The IT team and I were looking forward to re-shaping our school’s vision of technology. We’d even created a hashtag for our school, which did initially prompt several teachers to join Twitter.

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The title of our conference was Create Innovate Apply, and teachers were given time throughout the two days to meet in teams and reflect on a collaborative Google Presentation how they might ‘Apply’ their learning from the various workshops offered by Jeff and staff at our school.

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The final product was a multi-media reflective piece created using some of the suggested apps in the Tech Playground (a ‘dabble’ space set up with 10 iPads & creation apps):

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Four weeks later, it’s still too early to tell how much of a lasting impact those inspiring two days will have on teachers and their respective opinions about technology in the classroom. The reflective presentations by teachers showed renewed enthusiasm for taking risks with technology as well as many new ideas forming. Some teachers expressed a lack of practical application ideas, and wanted more time to ‘dabble’ in the Tech Playground. Overall, I sense that many teachers would have benefitted from more than just two days of new perspectives on 21st Century Learning (in fact, a COETAIL cohort might just be the answer!) Still, one of the most successful outcomes I experienced from those two days were the result of my 90-minute workshops on Blogging & ePortfolios in the PYP. I’ve decided to use this workshop as my UbD Final Project because I experienced first-hand the shift in teachers’ perspectives about blogs, just over the course of those 90 minutes. Both sessions began with fearful questions about consistency across grade-levels, parents comparing their students and fear of student work being ‘public’. After much discussion about the convenience of hosting students’ digital creations on one platform as well as creating a space that belonged to students (and empowered them to create and share) I saw the fears begin to slip away. The three weeks following the conference had me booked back-to-back with teachers wanting to introduce Easy Blogger Jr to their class and/or setting up blogs in their classroom. It was incredibly rewarding and further proof that teachers at our school were interested in showcasing learning and connecting with other classrooms, they just needed to see how it could be implemented in a purposeful way. I will know this project was successful if by the end of the school year (June 2015), all primary classrooms have at least a class blog, and if half of them have connected beyond our school community. This will create a strong starting point to kick-off even more global collaborative projects come September 2015.


 

Workshop: Showcasing Learning through Blogs & ePortfolios

My 90 minute workshop was broken down into two 45-min halves. The first 15 mins was an open discussion about blogging, what it meant, and allowing participants to voice their fears and concerns around privacy and sharing. I then defined blogging and went in depth about the 3 main kinds of blogs a teacher may have in his/her classroom:

  • Teacher’s Professional Blog
  • Shared Class Blog
  • Individual Student Blogs

I then discussed how blogging can enhance literacy and help promote a positive digital footprint. This was accomplished by referring to George Couros‘ post entitled 5 Reasons Your Students Should BlogI modified the five reasons to suit the audience and their students. I also made references back to a Sylvia Duckworth‘s Visual Notes Image on George Couros’ 8 Things to Look for in Today’s Classrooms, to link back to the point that blogging isn’t a separate task but rather a tool to support and promote 21st Century Skills.

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Screenshot of one of my Keynote Slides from my Workshop

The final 40 mins or so allowed teachers to play with the iPad app and set up their own Blogger Accounts for their class. The tutorial I provided (also below) allowed teachers to work on this independently, asking me for support when needed. This allowed me to walk around the room and address teacher questions. I also provided a PDF Handout with hyperlinks to examples of different kinds of blogs and some of the educators referenced throughout the Keynote Presentation.

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Related Videos to Support the Blogging Workshop

A tutorial I created for teachers to set up their Blogger Account:

Video Walk-Through of Easy Blogger Jr. (By the EasyAppCompany)

Demonstrating Literacy Links with Blogging in Grade 1:

A condensed version of my Blogging Keynote presentation to Teachers:


 

Teachers in Kindergarten through to Grade 5 have begun to set up their blogs in the four weeks since our edTech Conference. Several specialist teachers have asked to join class blogs so they can also contribute using the Easy Blogger Jr app. This is evident on Grade 1N Blog (the first exemplar blog created by Rebecca Navarro‘s class) where both the teachers and students post their learning.

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Below is a copy of my Final UbD Project. 

(Teacher self-assessment rubric below)

Teacher Self-Assessment Rubric: 

While I don’t plan to introduce the rubric this school year, I will bring it to my IT team and discuss possible ways to introduce it next year should admin agree for all classrooms to host blogs as part of the learning space. I’ve decided to use numbered ‘Phases’ rather than subjective criteria descriptors (Beginning, Developing, Consolidating etc.) that may pigeonhole teachers or cause them to feel inferior if they haven’t attained a specific standard. The Phase system allows teachers to moderate their progression and have ownership of their development as they explore blogs with their classes. Once the staff exhibit more confidence and greater understanding the rubric could be modified (with staff input) to accommodate different language to be assessed against. I envision these rubrics as something for teachers to have in their possession, rather than admin/coaches.